Monday, January 31, 2005

Seeking job in Hong Kong is much easier

It is much easier to find a job in Hong Kong than the mainland now, though Hong Kong's employee rate is worse compared with the number in the boom period.

Famous companies in the different careers including consulting, banking, information technology.etc, has been running to the campus to recruite the fresh graduates these days. But the local students are not all crazy about the events. Accenture, a popular brand in the world, only got the number of students from 150 to 200 in a single university. Also did its competitor, IBM. Several percents of the attendees are mainland students who are now studying in Hong Kong, which made it hard to say how many local students will finally apply for the jobs.

The situation is quite different from what I saw once in Shanghai and Beijing. Famous brands, like IBM, Microsoft, and the big four auditing companies, made all the students in the cities crazy, no matter which school. They all come to events, talk to HR managers and ask questions curiously. But the recruiting places are so limited that almost one in a hundred or several hundreds got the job.

The veteran blogger Fons, based in Shanghai, also quoted from CBIZ about the difficulty to find jobs in China. That definitely sounds. Economy is better doesn't mean it is easier to earn money. But not all the people are aware of it. I met a American woman who came from Taiwan. She planned to study in Hong Kong for a while and then go to mainland for jobs. "Mainland China is my best favorite and I want to teach there". She said. But she didn't know the foreigners in China are too many to find a decent-paid teaching job.

Economists are worried about China's ability to create new jobs. Chisato Haganuma, the chief strategist of Nomura Securities Limited(the leading securities and investment banking firm in Japan) said that the most important challenge for Chinese government is to create enough jobs, instead of the type of landing(hard landing or soft landing). But China's big population is a burden now. More and more university students can't find the jobs when they graduate. Even seriously, the regulation of Hukou (One has to reside in a city where he has the citizenship there) has limited people from freely flowing in the country.


10 comments:

無塵工作室 said...

It's strange to hear this...maybe HK student haven't realise the 'goodness' of such 'graduate jobs'? Or the human resourse market still haven't adapted itself yet?

If my degree doesn't have a 4 month summer project I will certainly apply to one of those myself@@...maybe most of them aren't ready for such things as 'jobs' yet, as HK's current youth culture maturing at a later age...well, I believe that will change in a year or two.

These sort of recruiment style had been around for a long time in UK and the US, and the results are very good. Many students attended those talks and many more applied.

Employment rate in the mainland will be a long term fight, I think.

Amy or koala said...

Hehe, you feel strange? I felt strange when I saw it at the first time. I used to think HK graduates have so many choices that they don't have time to apply some of the big companies.

But I really saw some students decent dressed and sit close with the recruiting managers. I think they have done a good job.

I don't know the situation in U.S and Europe. Only know some of my Chinese friends there are not that hard to find jobs.

無塵工作室 said...

It's a double-edge sword...working for big companies requires alot of hardwork and determination, also the competition is huge between collegues, so generally there's alot of pressure; whilst working for small companies can give you work experiences which you may need in the future, but the job prospect is definitely not as good as working in a big prestigeous company (eg. working for 'JPMorgan Chase' already sounds better than working for any other investment banks...).

So, which path do you like? I would like the 'big company' path...

Amy or koala said...

I prefer working in an independant thinking environment, no matter big or small companies, or even working myself:)

無塵工作室 said...

I guess that's why you did this degree, Amy (I've have read your blog from the beginning now). I would like to do that myself, but unfortunately for me and my position, I can't do that anymore. So I think you should take this chance. :)

Amy or koala said...

hehe, why you said your position forbid you doing the things you like? I don't think you are too old:)

無塵工作室 said...

As I am not prepared, and won't to do a PhD in optics in the near future, there won't be REAL independent jobs for me to do...most of the industries' jobs are client-oriented. I can think surely, but not independently. But I don't mind anymore.

Of course I'm not old, I'm not old at all! :P

Amy or koala said...

hehe, I c. But there is still chance.

Stepintowater said...

HK job market is brighter this year for fresh graduates. At least I smell it from the flush of recruitment talk email notification. I would say, for fresh graduates their are 3 ways out, big company, relative small ones, and stay in the ivory tower. Yes, choosing the suitable way for oneself aint' easy.

Stepintowater said...

Talking about independent jobs, none would more attractive then PhD study. Haha, though you are really get under-paid.